Skip to navigation – Site map
Articles

Reforming Juvenile Justice in Nineteenth-Century Scotland : The Subversion of the Scottish Day Industrial School Movement

Christine Kelly

Abstracts

This article traces the origins and development of fresh diversionary initiatives to respond to juvenile offending in Scottish cities from the mid-nineteenth century. This topic has been somewhat neglected by historians, but the Scottish contribution to juvenile justice reform was significant, both in the UK context and internationally. The paper focuses particularly on the inception and development across Scotland of a network of Day Industrial Schools first introduced in the 1840s. It addresses the changes in Scotland which were brought about by the impact of legislation that ushered in the statutory UK framework governing certified industrial and reformatory schools. The article considers how pressures for uniformity resulted in a marked departure from the welfarist ethos of the reformers undermined the original ideals of reform.

Top of page

Excerpt

Full text document will be published online on December 2019.

Outline

The political, legal and social context of the changes
The Glasgow Houses of Refuge under local legislation
The Aberdeen system : origins of the day industrial school
The Day Industrial Schools in practice
The statutory system
Conclusion

First lines

This account examines the origins and development of fresh initiatives to respond to juvenile offending in Scottish cities from the mid-nineteenth century, exploring matters from a legal historian’s viewpoint. The Scottish contribution in the field of juvenile justice reform has been somewhat neglected by historians but its impact was significant and far reaching, extending throughout the UK, and even as far afield as Australia. It was widely appreciated well into the twentieth century that the Scottish system provided the template for industrial schools throughout Britain. As the influential English Report of the Departmental Committee on the Treatment of Young Offenders of 1927 observed in reviewing the history of schools and institutions for young offenders in England, the Scottish day industrial schools “may be regarded as the parents of the industrial schools.” Despite this wide-reaching influence, the origins of reform began humbly, with local, philanthropically-inspired respo...

Top of page

References

Electronic reference

Christine Kelly, « Reforming Juvenile Justice in Nineteenth-Century Scotland : The Subversion of the Scottish Day Industrial School Movement », Crime, Histoire & Sociétés / Crime, History & Societies [Online], Vol. 20, n°2 | 2016, Online since 01 December 2019, connection on 20 July 2017. URL : http://chs.revues.org/1670 ; DOI : 10.4000/chs.1670

Top of page

About the author

Christine Kelly

A qualified solicitor with a PhD from the University of lasgow, is currently a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the Law School of the University of Glasgow. Her post-doctoral research – following her doctoral research on the criminalisation of children in Scotland between 1840 and 1910 – investigates the criminalisation of children in Scotland in the period from 1910 to 1971. The aim is to provide a broader vision of the historical origins of the distinctive Scottish approach to juvenile justice. The author would like to thank Lindsay Farmer for his helpful comments on an earlier version of this paper. - Christine.Kelly@glasgow.ac.uk

Top of page

Copyright

© Droz

Top of page
  • Revues.org