Navigation – Plan du site
Forum

Rethinking the state monopolisation thesis : the historiography of policing and criminal justice in nineteenth-century England

David C. Churchill
p. 131-152

Résumés

Cet article examine la manière dont les historiens ont interprété l’évolution de la relation entre la criminalité, l’action de la police et l’État dans l’Angleterre du XIXe siècle. Plus spécifiquement, il retrace l’influence de la thèse de la monopolisation par l’État – l’idée d’une « société policée ». Le poids de ce modèle est évalué en comparant des travaux relatifs à la justice pénale des XVIIIe et XIXe siècles, et en pointant les discontinuités frappantes dans la manière dont ils ont traité certaines questions-clés. L’article présente ensuite une critique de la thèse de la monopolisation étatique, avant de dégager les priorités des recherches à venir. Ces orientations nouvelles devraient conduire à une vision plus sophistiquée de la gouvernance de la criminalité dans l’Angleterre moderne, et amener l’histoire pénale du XIXe siècle à étudier l’expérience vécue des gens ordinaires.

Haut de page

Notes de l’auteur

An earlier version of this paper was presented at the ‘work in progress’ seminar of the International Centre for the History of Crime, Policing and Justice at The Open University on 21 July 2010. I am grateful to the attendees for their reflections on my argument. I would also like to thank those who have discussed these issues with me at greater length, especially my supervisors Paul Lawrence and Ros Crone, as well as Jennifer Davis, Francis Dodsworth, Clive Emsley, Vic Gatrell, Pete King, Chris Williams, and three anonymous readers for this journal.

Extrait du texte

Ce document sera publié en ligne en texte intégral en juillet 2017.

Plan

Introduction
The state monopolisation thesis
From ‘golden age’ to ‘policed society’
A flawed narrative
Putting the people back in : directions for further research

Aperçu du texte

Introduction

The nineteenth century occupies a key conceptual space in the historiography of crime and justice. As in so many fields of social experience, it witnessed manifold changes which, retrospectively, seem to herald the arrival of ‘modern’ arrangements. One might cite, for example, the abolition of public bodily punishments, or the accumulation of criminal statistics. This essay, however, reviews a particular conception of modern law-enforcement, which has long been central to criminal justice history. This is the state monopolisation thesis : the idea that the governance of crime transferred from the people to the police in the nineteenth century. This interpretation found several enthusiastic subscribers amongst pioneering historians of crime, yet moreover, it continues to shape the terms of debate in histories of nineteenth-century crime and justice, most of which as a consequence remain skewed towards state institutions.

This article starts by explicating the state monopol...

Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

David C. Churchill, « Rethinking the state monopolisation thesis : the historiography of policing and criminal justice in nineteenth-century England », Crime, Histoire & Sociétés / Crime, History & Societies, Vol. 18, n°1 | 2014, 131-152.

Référence électronique

David C. Churchill, « Rethinking the state monopolisation thesis : the historiography of policing and criminal justice in nineteenth-century England », Crime, Histoire & Sociétés / Crime, History & Societies [En ligne], Vol. 18, n°1 | 2014, mis en ligne le 01 juillet 2017, consulté le 21 juin 2017. URL : http://chs.revues.org/1471 ; DOI : 10.4000/chs.1471

Haut de page

Auteur

David C. Churchill

David Churchill is Economic History Society Anniversary Research Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research / Birkbeck, University of London. He recently completed his doctoral thesis, ‘Crime, policing and control in Leeds, c.1830-1890’, at The Open University. He also works on leisure and popular culture, and is author of ‘Living in a leisure town : residential reactions to the growth of popular tourism in Southend, 1870-1890’, Urban History, forthcoming, 2014, 41, 1.

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

© Droz

Haut de page
  • Revues.org